Mad Girl’s Love Song — Sylvia Plath

“I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead;
I lift my lids and all is born again.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

The stars go waltzing out in blue and red,
And arbitrary blackness gallops in:
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.

I dreamed that you bewitched me into bed
And sung me moon-struck, kissed me quite insane.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

God topples from the sky, hell’s fires fade:
Exit seraphim and Satan’s men:
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.

I fancied you’d return the way you said,
But I grow old and I forget your name.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

I should have loved a thunderbird instead;
At least when spring comes they roar back again.
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)”

.

Sylvia Plath

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152 thoughts on “Mad Girl’s Love Song — Sylvia Plath

      1. I don’t think he’s that bad, but his biggest accomplishment was being the inspiration behind many of her poems (just read the book Ariel). That’s all.

        I’m impossible myself.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. But the best writers were very promiscuous (Albert Camus?).

        I just don’t like him because he made her suffer. He wouldn’t get away today — I’d make him pay for breaking such a special heart.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. But Byron was the best at the time… Plus, maybe they were promiscuous and just decided not to write about it.

        I love Romanticism, but always with a bit of decadence.

        One of best Romantics in Brazil (Álvares de Azevedo) died a virgin at the age of 21, although some of his poems transpire promiscuity. I think that’s one of the things that makes him marvelous.

        Not being promiscuous myself makes me doubt my poetic potential.
        And you, Amit — you’re such a good boy yourself.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. yes I am but I was not and you know what goes around, comes around as well… so I am kind of at the receiving phase of my past sins ;) (that’s basically my ego trying to assert that I may have some poetic potentials buried in my past) but on second thought may be I should just agree with you :D what I believe is a romantic cannot write what s/he is not living through, so to write about dejection they ought to be scorned first and if they were promiscuous it would have come out in their writings. Shelley was a platonic lover and he had many correspondences with Elizabeth Hitchener is public and Keats had Fanny to pine for…

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Silly, I wasn’t hinting that you didn’t have any poetic potential. That was meant to be a smarty compliment, though. I just think we’re all prone to promiscuity — especially poets.

        Fernando Pessoa (Portuguese poet; not sure if you know him, but you seem to know everything about English poetry) said that the poet fakes so much that he feels in fact the pain he pretends to be feeling (I’m paraphrasing it).
        I have an open journal, so my pain and all my other feelings are as real as they can be… Unfortunately.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I vehemently protest against Mr. Pessoa’s theory … a poet cannot fake and the moment one does, one becomes a scribe or someone who is writing annuls in rhythm. (you have my apologies for being an illiterate in any poetry other than English) but having read some translated Greek works I can say this much, Homer and Herodotus both wrote in rhythm, yet now Homer is the poet of all poets and the latter an ancient scribe whose narration is flawed with misrepresented facts. I think because Herodotus faked his emotions… there is a unique equilibrium in your comment, ;) the first word (silly) is perfectly countered by the last (unfortunately) but still if you insist, “unfortunately” an open journal is the only kind of poetry there is (for is not the play “Hamlet” an open journal of the prince Hamlet, the first modern human, imagined by Shakespeare at least 300 years before their appearance?)… yes we are allowed use our poetic license but to unveil the illusion of common reality from objects in the real world! that is why we protest against atrocities justified by feigned national interests and discover beauty in the ugly ducklings… sorry for making it so long but I think Mr. Pessoa’s theory, combined with some recent experiences from contemporary poets’ misuse of the license, managed to struck a note deep inside! :D Peace!

        Liked by 1 person

      7. I think that Fernando Pessoa was trying to express the exact opposite of what he said (he was quite ironic!). I’ve been rewriting this reply for five minutes now. I think that to understand Pessoa’s poetry you need to understand that he was a “faker” — he had several personas that transcended the simplicity of a nom de plume. He’d dive into his “personalities” so deeply that they became totally different people, apart from the poet he was. That is what he meant in his statement, I suppose. Knowing his background, I have to agree with him that the poet can fake the pain that, in fact, he feels.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. That is the fun in his statement… He pretends to feel the pain that, in fact, he feels. I know it seems like a weird paradox, but it makes so much sense to me. Sometimes we hide behind dubious words, or live unaware of what in fact we feel, trying to hide our own feelings — but they always resurface.

        Liked by 1 person

      9. yes that is something I can agree with and can relate too, one can pretend to feel the pain that one is in fact feeling… that is a good defense against the real pain, in some way…. And yes they always come out!

        Liked by 1 person

      10. So now do you agree that

        The poet is a faker
        Who’s so good at his act
        He even fakes the pain
        Of pain he feels in fact

        ? o;

        Yes, I like when I “win” friendly debates.
        You can also pretend that I did.

        Liked by 1 person

      11. no no, no pretensions are needed! I concede, honestly and yes now I agree that The poet is a faker so good at his act He can even fake the pain he feels in fact! had a thunderstorm in the area, so wi-fi was shut down :( resulting in the delay!

        Liked by 1 person

      12. that’s a tough question to answer because I have none. I used to be a broadcast journalist until June last year… not doing anything except writing and living off my savings since then…. :b

        Liked by 1 person

      13. According to someone who knows me really well (or thinks that he does!), I am an accidental angel. Thank you.

        I need to make my ego say the same; being too angelic and humble doesn’t always reflect the truth.

        Liked by 1 person

      14. I think my humbleness lies in my goodness and kindness. Don’t forget my mercifulness and my sweetness.
        See? I’m very humble (well, I am IRL!).

        Occidental angel doesn’t sound bad. That’s pretty neat.

        Liked by 1 person

      15. well I sort of went illiterate about post 2004 computer terms… new 25 would have been so much better… unfortunately sometime I feel like 15 and at other times 65 (: and perhaps my overzealous curiosity about life and the urge to drink life to lees have contributed in grAying up my core faster than age might have been… just speculating… IDK for sure!

        Liked by 1 person

      16. My age fluctuates between 23, 17 and 75. I think it all depends on your mood, right?

        Oh, I really meant what I said about 35 being the new 25. Also, sometimes grAy cores announce that the first gray hair is coming.

        Liked by 1 person

      17. been laughing a lot after some time and you have my gratitude for that. also being one with an average weekly quota of about 500 words (both on keyboard and IRL) I haven’t talked so much in more than 3 months! and may all my future marriages to any girl to whom hair matters a lot also fail!

        Liked by 1 person

      18. You’re welcome! I guess that means I’m a fun person to hang out with (no idea why!).

        Since I’m a teacher (and student), I end up talking A LOT on a daily basis, yet I don’t have many friends, so it’s nice to chat whenever I have a chance.

        Liked by 1 person

      19. that’s a relief because I was just thinking about apologizing for turning this post of yours into a chatting session… teaching is one of the noblest profession one can have. I did not laugh my heart out because I found you a fun person to hang out with. I laugh when I can open myself up without thinking too much about the other person’s hypocrisy, prejudice and ego, that makes you a kind, selfless and honest person to hang out with. you seem to be a rare kind of human… have you tried the 16 personality types test by Jung and Meyers?

        Liked by 1 person

      20. That’s such a flattering comment. Thank you!
        Yes, a couple years ago. I love Jung, but I try not to think too much about psychology unless I’m in class. You probably know my psyche really well from my poems and rants about my psychiatrist, etc. Such a rare person like me must be a little crazy, right?

        I agree with you — teaching is one of the noblest professions one can have, yet this world doesn’t seem to agree with us. I’m $till underpaid. Oh life.

        Liked by 1 person

      21. you are welcome! I took it last year, was classified as an INFP, loved what I read.. anthropology and psychology are jointly my third favorite subjects after literature and philosophy. what you have just said contains two universal facts, first of all, all rare things are crazy, haven’t you heard the Pink Floyd’s song, shine on you crazy diamond… diamonds are crazy because they are rare and rarer, the crazier … secondly in today’s capitalism infested world the nobler the profession, the less it pays. so a social welfare worker must work as a volunteer while some one in charge of flooding a habitat by building a dam in Egypt, placating a prince by building the tallest luxurious hotel in UAE or ensuring national security in USA by eavesdropping on foreign nationals are among the highest paid professionals in the world… in Shakespeare’s words, “‘Tis an unweeded garden. That grows to seed. Things rank and gross in nature. Possess it merely.”

        Liked by 1 person

      22. Well, you just wrote a comment about foreign politics, Shakespeare, capitalism and Pink Floyd — and I felt even more flattered because I felt that you compared me to a diamond (a crazy diamond, but a diamond!). I love psychology and philosophy as well, like most of the people who like to read and write, poets or not.
        I’m an INFJ, but I’m not sure if my result would be the same if I took the test *today* since these last couple years were mind opening. Also, I’m on some psych meds, and I feel like they affect my mood (I mean, they do!), but I’m an INFJ as far as I know.

        Liked by 1 person

      23. yes I did compare you to a diamond, albeit a crazy one and crazy is always good… according to the JM theory INFJ make up only 7% of the world population, so you know your rarity. you are a poet through and through, even if you did not love psychology and philosophy. psyche meds are one way to deal with the perverted reality that we have to endure all day long

        Liked by 1 person

      24. Well, it’s not that. I just like when people see me as an enigma.

        I haven’t done anything heroic, though… Maybe keeping bits of sanity after these 23 years can be seem as heroic and incredible.

        Liked by 1 person

      25. Do I sound older?

        I have a poem that says I wish I could start smoking like an old school philosopher, just to accelerate the process (death)

        That’s such a terrible thing to say at my age. Who smokes nowadays?

        Liked by 1 person

      26. I do :( been doing it since fifteen (whoa that’s twenty years)… wish I had accelerated mine! and you were not smoking, just wishing that you could start… no you sound exactly 14 billion years old, not a second older!

        Liked by 1 person

      27. Honestly, you’re not THAT old. One of my sisters is almost your age (although she looks 17)… You probably just look older because you got been married twice — bad marriages make people look older and worn out.

        Liked by 1 person

      28. Honestly, you’re not THAT old. One of my sisters is almost your age (although she looks 17)… You probably just look older because you got married twice — bad marriages make people look older and worn out.

        Liked by 1 person

      29. It sounds like “I committed the same mistake twice, making me not that smart”

        JK (this means joke, Amit)

        You weren’t “not so smart” — you’re just a romantic.

        Liked by 1 person

      30. well I consider myself as a knight in the order of Simon Bolivar (I know that’s too high but when it comes to knighthood I am truly ambitious and we will not go extinct as long as there are Prometheus Unbound and Ode to The West Wind in the world…

        Liked by 1 person

      31. well, we are surrounded by India, literally and culturally, so Hindi (the national language of India) is a very popular language here, I can understand it when being spoken but cannot read, write or speak!

        Like

      32. I don’t mean to intrude, but where are you, specifically?

        Ha, that’s me with French, Spanish and Italian (Romance Languages in general are all very similar), although I can read them and understand most of what I see and hear, I can’t speak them.

        Liked by 1 person

      33. And I thought you were in India! *roll eyes* that’s how smart I am.

        So do I. Especially French poets. Have you ever read Charles Baudelaire or Paul Éluard? Those are two of my favorites.

        Liked by 1 person

      34. Baudelaire is incomprehensibly beautiful and I am in love with him, haven’t read Eluard :( if you google for our map you will see that we are literally inside India, so there is nothing wrong in your thought!

        Liked by 1 person

      35. I’m terrible with maps! I barely know where I am.

        Do you want to live there forever?

        I have so many books about Baudelaire that I’ve lost count of them… It’s an addiction which started when I was in my mid teens.

        Liked by 1 person

      36. :( all my bad addictions preceded my good ones… so I came to know about Baudelaire in my mid twenties… had I been there, I would have already lined up at your door to borrow some… and no I definitely do not want to live here forever but i will as long as my mother lives for being a housewife all her life to raise her 2 sons and a daughter, now she has none to lean upon… both my younger brother and sister lives in separate cities with their lives and families… i hope i am not being too frank for your comfort!

        Like

      37. That’s okay, I like honest, upfront people.

        I wish I could suggest you to take her with you, but that’s not a real possibility, is it?

        It’s very honorable of you that you want to stay there for her.

        Liked by 1 person

      38. and now you are being very kind… the conventional society has coined a term for people like me: “parasite singles” – individuals who live with their parents without getting married

        Liked by 1 person

      39. That’s ridiculous… Today’s economy and individual factors affects people’s lives. There’s nothing wrong with living with your parents if they’re okay with it.

        Liked by 1 person

      40. no wonder I find your words so relatable, being fluctuated between 35, 15 and 65 because 17 + 23 + 75 = 110 = 15 + 35 + 65 :D so both of our average mental age is exactly 110/3 = 36+ … that is awesome!

        Liked by 1 person

      41. hahahaha … how about this then, all of us were created with the universe so physically we are at least more than 14 billion years old… 37/23/15 are all ages of our consciousness… so tell me, in a 14 billion year old body what difference does it make if our consciousness is 23 or 38?

        Liked by 1 person

      42. It depends if my face is wrinkled or not. Despite my efforts not to mind my looks, I do like to have young, soft skin.

        But no, it doesn’t really matter much (I’ll keep dodging the comments with numbers!).

        Liked by 1 person

      43. thanks for the heads up :D I will remember to put them in words instead in the future. of course the skin of your consciousness is always as smooth as it is when one is 21… unless we let it get wrinkled by hurting nature or humanity

        Liked by 1 person

      44. one can hurt humanity by making false promises, deceiving, committing atrocities or acts of terrorism.. so on and so forth… in short by hurting other human beings physically, mentally, financially or socially… yes I have many wrinkles :( but I am determined to acquire no more!

        Liked by 1 person

      45. Oh, I thought we’d start a deep philosophical debate, but now I get that hurting humanity is basically acting like Hitler or the average politician.

        I’m sorry, but there’s no escape. Writers get wrinkled faster than the majority of people.

        Liked by 1 person

      46. that is because being the conscience of their age, the writers must bear the brunt of that age’s sins! the topic most definitely calls for a philosophic discourse but as the hour of the wolf is approaching on the western side of the Pacific I must regretfully call it a night… how about I commence the debate after about eight hours from now? you can join in whenever it is convenient for you!

        Liked by 1 person

      47. Aw. I kind of want to reply fully now, but I’ll let you go. This convo can keep going whenever you want, my quasi friend. Just comment, and I’ll respond asap.

        Liked by 1 person

      48. my gratitude for your kindness! do reply whenever and whatever you feel like saying. I promise to continue in eight hours unless I am rendered unable to do so by life or the lack of it.

        Liked by 1 person

      49. Haha, oh poor Amit. You’re so sleepy you sent a comment without finishing it (I’m talking about your previous comment!). Don’t worry (:
        Same!

        Sweet dreams!

        Liked by 1 person

      50. oh forgot to say one more thing, the way things are progressing, soon it will be only writers who would have any wrinkles on their consciousness, the rest will become too indifferent!

        Liked by 1 person

  1. ok… now Dr. Google has taught me IRL and AFK :p perhaps a little more light on my BG will tell you why IRL was incomprehensible… I did my first undergrad in CSE in 2000 (in the hope of becoming a game engine developer) so only when I was at my terminal I was IRL… by 2005 I realized that I was taking all my words and actions with fellow human beings for granted by thinking I could press alt + bksp… so I switched my life, abandoned software engineering and started studying English literature… “unfortunately” after interacting with fellow beings for 10 years I am again confined to the realm of my laptop.. so I guess I have come a full circle. and since my reporting career’s demise I have not really had any real life other than the WP blogosphere, some facebook and twittering (there again, see my pathetic attempts at trying to classify these as real life!) thanks for using a new abbreviation!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. After reading your comment, and having many things to comment on, I just have one question to ask… How old are you? That’s quite a long life story.
      Mhm, I’m very blunt sometimes. Don’t be self-conscious, I can edit your age.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. oh, it was dissolved after 3 grueling years, then I tried again 6 years later at 32. when this too lasted for 3 years, I knew that’s my limit of accepting the power dynamics inherent in a marriage. BTW, and I mean no offense, what do you mean by that’s your current age? 426 months?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m horrible at math, so… 23. That probably equals, uhhh, 426 months…?

        Well, I don’t know you, but I doubt that you won’t get married again. So… Good luck next time.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. :D no my dear unknown friend from the land of the Amazon, 23 years equal 276 months and 35 equals 420 but now you have arrived at my most favorite topic for discussion… the title, “why most of the 21st century humans should refrain from tying the knot” … there are 3 primary reasons, each countering one of the primary reasons why humans should marry (I think there are roughly 4 reasons why a human ties the knot) a. social advancement – I think we should come a long way from the Victorian notion of social status based on wealth or ancestry, I am for the recognition of one’s quality and skills over relations when assessing a person. b. to make the dissipation of sexual urges less chaotic and more ethical – both the sense of harmony and ethics should come from one’s soul without making it a business transaction of some sort, where one is committed for the sake of a legal document, social repercussions or in the hope of their commitment being reciprocated. c. propagating the gene – :D there are already 8 billion mouths feeding on Gaia, though I don’t think one man’s genes not propagated would make any difference either way but I am just doing my bit… so all that remains is the 4th reason which is love that begets an urge of togetherness in two souls but marriage hardly has anything to do with love, I have seen too many loveless marriages and even more extramarital affairs to claim that love and marriage are mostly mutually exclusive… the purpose of all these is that I wish you wish me luck on my celibacy! :b

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Good luck. Your chances are very high since all you’ve been doing is staying on the computer (:

        I agree with every single reason you mentioned, plus, men wanted to make sure that women were really giving birth to their children, so they wouldn’t father someone else’s child.

        Yet, I irrationally like the whole “marriage and children” idea. Not sure if I will ever get married, but I’m still a dreamer.

        Liked by 1 person

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